Un seul résultat réel

This post is a conversation conducted in French among three people. It pits the informed horse lover against the uninformed horse lover. Nothing new here except for the eloquence of my friend, Evelyne and someone named Cody Leblanc. Please share this post with your French-speaking friends and relatives. It is crucial to get the truth and the facts out there because all Quebec horse lovers need to know what is really happening in their abattoirs. Continuons en français….

Bobinette :   Un débat à deux sens, deux mesures, deux mentalités, mais un seul résultat réel: les chevaux souffrent plus de la fermeture des abattoirs, car ceux qui y ont recours (pour diverses raisons) n’auront pas d’autres options.

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Karin Hauenstein: Horse Crusader

Karin and I had a rocky start.  She thought I was a horse-killer.  She’s on a ride to stop horse slaughter, and when she first emailed me, she was using a smartphone.  Somehow, the wires got crossed (and since I can’t text while driving a car, I can only imagine what it’s like being in-saddle and negotiating a phone!).  Karin is a true crusader for our horses, and not just because she’s on a four-legged walkabout to publicize the cause, but because this is a woman who has done her homework…in spades…and all of it–the ride, the research–all of it comes from sheer love and respect for horses.

What really impressed me–once I introduced myself properly–was Karin’s research into the flight chemicals released in every head-shot horse.  I will let Karin explain it

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Don’t Let Harper Cut the CFIA

A dear friend of mine who observed and monitored feedlots and horse slaughter in Western Canada for years before the CHDC or myself or any other group that I know of warned me just recently that while we’re busy maligning the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), the horsemeat industry is well and even thriving.  Her comments brought me up short.  One of my own chief arguments has been how absurdly understaffed the CFIA is, but it’s been too easy to pursue them and their shortcomings rather than the Government of Canada itself or an industry which closes ranks like a secret society whenever the public demands specifics–and gets away with it.

I replied rather sheepishly to my friend by saying that Canadians have every right to expect their own food safety agency to protect our health.  And we do, and it should.  But you can’t get blood from a stone.  That’s why the cuts to our food safety program that the Harper government is planning are so scary:

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Gazette Food Critic Enjoys Horsemeat

Lesley Chesterman, food critic of The Montreal Gazette, reviewed a restaurant in Montreal called “DNA”.  This is what she wrote about the horse filet dish served by chef Derek Dammann:

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Avon & China: the Economics of Harm

UPDATE from In Defense of Animals, posted on FB, July 2014. China Stops Cosmetic Animal Testing The Chinese government just passed a law that removes animal testing requirements on cosmetic products. With a $1.7 billion cosmetics industry, this is a major change that will save countless animal lives. This is a huge reversal from China’s 2012 animal testing mandate for all cosmetic products, which prompted companies like Avon and Estée Lauder to drop their cruelty-free policies and start animal testing in order to tap into the growing Chinese cosmetics market. Due to loopholes in the law, experts warn that some animal testing may continue, but it’s a big step in the compassionate direction.
Let’s leave the subject of animals for a moment, and focus on the specious arguments by which multi-national industries get away with murder, so to speak. In the late sixties, when I was about 16, I watched a TV documentary on how cosmetics and beauty care companies experimented on animals to both test and improve their products (at the time, as I recall, “hypoallergenic” shampoos were the newest thing). TV images in that doc of cats with their skulls prised open and electrodes attached to their brains, eyes, and faces left me in shock.
I had only just begun wearing makeup (strict upbringing) and was now faced with what I thought was a moral dilemma. I had already joined the second wave of feminism and would shortly be working with other young women to set up a Women’s Centre at my local college (CEGEP). Wasn’t that enough? Some of the more militant feminists had already eschewed cosmetics, but for completely unrelated reasons.

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