Ground Manners’ First Anniversary

Ground Manners’ First Anniversary

GGround Manners. A Novel was published 13 months ago.  One of the traditional publishers I’d sent it to wrote back saying that it was too political.  At least half a dozen advocacy organizations said they would publicize it on their sites; the only Canadian organizations that did were the CHDC and CHHAPS.  Since then, Carol M. Upton of Dreams Aloud Promotions  (see blog) has had reviews published in six horse magazines for which I am very grateful.

But Evelyne Villers was the very first journalist courageous enough to publish her Book Review on a novel written in English about the Québec horse industry.  And today, she re-published her Review with a few changes and also publicized my upcoming booth at the Salon du Livre in Rigaud this Sunday, March 25th.  I can’t thank her enough for this heart-warming surprise.  Please go here to read Evelyne’s review (en français).

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Welcome to CynthiaDErrico.com!

Welcome to CynthiaDErrico.com!

Stay a while and share your thoughts. Nous parlons français.  Reposez-vous et partagez vos pensées !  

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Desperately Seeking… Cynthia (Anyone can Knit)

Desperately Seeking… Cynthia (Anyone can Knit)

It was my “animus prodigious”…like Churchill’s “black dog”…the thing that consumed me, rendered everything I achieved pale by comparison (and, let’s face it:  I’ve been on radio, cable TV–known in two provinces for a skill I will speak of later), and yet, I look at this book I’ve published (to no little acclaim), and all I can think is:  what next?  The gumshoe voyageur must live still within me because what never seems to satisfy me is the thing itself whereas what drives me onward is pursuing the next thing.  No rest at the destination, the achievement itself; there is rest only in striving, reaching for the next thing. In the movie, “Doubt”, the Meryl Streep character says:  “In the pursuit of wrongdoing, one steps away from God.”  This is ambiguous. I think the writer meant “the prosecution of wrongdoing”, not “the pursuit”.  In Ground Manners, Volpone and Rash “pursue” wrongdoing as if wrongdoing were, in and of itself, a thing to be desired and therefore, chased after.  
In that way, yes, they step away from God:  Volpone in his congenital madness, not ever knowing good from evil, just following the lights he was born with, miscreant that he is.  Volpone “pursues” wrongdoing unawares; in his mind, he pursues, avidly, the gratification of pleasure which, for him, is the ultimate good, independent of the moral:  his pursuit is the truly amoral.  Volpone is like a man with no hands desperately wishing to play piano. He is like the limbless but hopeful snake about to read a how-to book on knitting called, “Anyone Can Knit.”  Rash, on the other hand, has found power, seated himself comfortably within its limitless bounds, and pursues wrongdoing–not because, like Volpone, he knows no better–but just because it pleases him to do so.  

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