Wittgenstein

He wrote:  “Man may signify things by words, but God signifies by the things themselves.”  Deb Harper was good enough to teach me how to listen to her horses without making a total horse’s xxx of myself.  Words fail me here so read the nuances here in each picture as if you were reading text. (For more pix, go to the Photos menu on the left.)

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Peach Cloud

Peach Cloud

There are certain things, which, like air, I need to live:  Fred, my Bouvier, who is ever-present though he has stepped away these last three years and gavottes in heavenly fields with my aunt whose loss leaves me permanently lonesome; a passionate purpose like my relentlessness about compassion towards animals, especially horses; astrology which brings me closer to those heavenly pastures; and David (though if you tell him, I will deny it immediately) whose radiant inner goodness defeats every attempt he makes to be macho.  My computer and car would be third cousins, important but not as essential as all the former.  Not least are my gardens and within that circle would be my irises and my hostas (although, in case they’re reading this, all my plant and flowering plants are important to me).  I will be posting pictures of my standard White Irises shortly (which are profuse) and the surprising Peach Cloud (tall bearded) which appeared as if by magic in my back garden; at least three feet tall, featuring seven buds on two stems (two only!) and sporting a tangerine beard.  (Who knew?)  My favourite is purple but I must say that just by Peach’s size and leaf fall (quite majestic), I have been seduced into loving–if not its colour–then its sense of its own importance and uniqueness (how many peach-coloured Irises have you seen lately?).  The Iris is connected to the goddess of the Rainbow but that has little to do with my life-long love and attraction to it:  its petals alternately fall in bride-like trains or shy forward in closeted high-school confidentials, and it sits atop a stem so thick and sturdy that no wind-rock can bring it down.  Where in life can you find such delicacy supported by such strength?  Such strength birthing such fragility?…  

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Desperately Seeking… Cynthia (Anyone can Knit)

Desperately Seeking… Cynthia (Anyone can Knit)

It was my “animus prodigious”…like Churchill’s “black dog”…the thing that consumed me, rendered everything I achieved pale by comparison (and, let’s face it:  I’ve been on radio, cable TV–known in two provinces for a skill I will speak of later), and yet, I look at this book I’ve published (to no little acclaim), and all I can think is:  what next?  The gumshoe voyageur must live still within me because what never seems to satisfy me is the thing itself whereas what drives me onward is pursuing the next thing.  No rest at the destination, the achievement itself; there is rest only in striving, reaching for the next thing. In the movie, “Doubt”, the Meryl Streep character says:  “In the pursuit of wrongdoing, one steps away from God.”  This is ambiguous. I think the writer meant “the prosecution of wrongdoing”, not “the pursuit”.  In Ground Manners, Volpone and Rash “pursue” wrongdoing as if wrongdoing were, in and of itself, a thing to be desired and therefore, chased after.  
In that way, yes, they step away from God:  Volpone in his congenital madness, not ever knowing good from evil, just following the lights he was born with, miscreant that he is.  Volpone “pursues” wrongdoing unawares; in his mind, he pursues, avidly, the gratification of pleasure which, for him, is the ultimate good, independent of the moral:  his pursuit is the truly amoral.  Volpone is like a man with no hands desperately wishing to play piano. He is like the limbless but hopeful snake about to read a how-to book on knitting called, “Anyone Can Knit.”  Rash, on the other hand, has found power, seated himself comfortably within its limitless bounds, and pursues wrongdoing–not because, like Volpone, he knows no better–but just because it pleases him to do so.  

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